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What Does The Qur’an Say About Jesus of Nazareth?

22 Feb

Jesus of Nazareth is mentioned numerous times in the Holy Qur’an. In fact, Jesus’ name is mentioned more times in the Qur’an than is Muhammed’s. The Qur’an is the Divine Revelatio…

Source: What Does The Qur’an Say About Jesus of Nazareth?

What Does The Qur’an Say About Jesus of Nazareth?

21 Feb

Jesus of Nazareth is mentioned numerous times in the Holy Qur’an. In fact, Jesus’ name is mentioned more times in the Qur’an than is Muhammed’s. The Qur’an is the Divine Revelatio…

Source: What Does The Qur’an Say About Jesus of Nazareth?

George Takei: On this Remembrance Day, I hear terrible echoes of the past

19 Feb

(Article from CNN) George Takei is an actor and activist. His Broadway show “Allegiance” screens across cinemas in the United States on the Day of Remembrance, February 19. Follow him o…

Source: George Takei: On this Remembrance Day, I hear terrible echoes of the past

George Takei: On this Remembrance Day, I hear terrible echoes of the past

19 Feb

(Article from CNN)

George Takei is an actor and activist. His Broadway show “Allegiance” screens across cinemas in the United States on the Day of Remembrance, February 19.

Follow him on Twitter @GeorgeTakei. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

George Takei

STORY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • George Takei recalls his family being taken by soldiers from their home in LA and forced to live in an internment camp in 1942
  • Sunday is the 75th anniversary of FDR executive order that allowed this discrimination against Japanese-Americans, he says
  • Takei: As Trump crafts orders to single out Muslims and immigrants, Americans must not stand for this echo from the past

I was just a child of 5 when soldiers marched up our driveway in a Los Angeles residential neighborhood, bayonets in hand, and pounded on our front door, ordering us out.

We were permitted only what we could carry, no bedding, no pets.

I remember my mother’s tears as she and our father gathered us up, with our precious few belongings in hand.

She was determined to bring a sewing machine, fearful that we would need to make or mend clothes where we were headed.

She wasn’t sure the authorities would allow her to take that Singer machine, so she kept it a secret, even from us.

She managed, however, to pack a few treats for us children for the long journey ahead.

That was in 1942.

Earlier that year, on February 19, 75 years ago this Sunday, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order, No. 9066, which set the internment into motion.

On its face, the order was “neutral,” authorizing the military to designate whole swaths of land as military zones, and evacuate any persons from it as they saw fit.

But behind that facade lay a much darker purpose: to tear 120,000 innocent Japanese-Americans from their homes along the West Coast and relocate them to 10 prison (internment/concentration) camps scattered throughout the United States.

Oakland, California. Part of family unit of Japanese ancestry leave Wartime Civil Control Administr . . .

It didn’t matter, back then, that most of us were US citizens and had never even been to Japan.

We were presumed guilty, and held without charge for four years, simply because we happened to look like the people who had bombed Pearl Harbor.

For that crime, we lost our homes, our livelihoods and our freedoms.

Every year, on February 19, we Japanese-Americans honor this day as Remembrance Day, and we renew our pledge to make sure what happened to us never happens again in America.

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I am always amazed, and saddened, that despite our decades long efforts, so many young people today are not even aware that such a tragedy and miscarriage of justice took place here.

And I grow increasingly concerned that we are careening toward a future where such a thing would again be possible.

A few months into his campaign, Donald Trump refused to outright reject the policies and fears that underlay the internment.

Instead, he suggested that it was a tough call, and that he “would have had to be there” in order to know whether it was the wrong one.

Trump ignored the inconvenient fact that not a single case of espionage or sabotage was ever proven against any internee, and that the military itself admitted that there was never any evidence to support their sweeping policy.

A few months later, a top Trump surrogate went on television and suggested that the internment might actually serve as a “precedent” for another Trump policy — the registration of Muslim-Americans in a database.

I cannot help but hear in these words terrible echoes from the past.

The internment happened because of three things:

fear, prejudice and a failure of political leadership.

When the administration targets groups today, whether for exclusion from travel here on the basis of religion and national origin, or for deportation based on their undocumented status, I know from personal experience that these are not done, as they claim, truly in the name of national security. 

No, instead they are intended to strike fear into communities, to show the muscle and “toughness” of a new president, and to divide the citizenry against itself.

These are the acts of a despot, not an elected leader.

I have dedicated my life to standing against our nation’s impulse toward demagoguery and tyranny by the whipped-up masses.

The answer lies not just in education, but in empathy.

The false narrative — that there are those who belong here and those who do not — is designed precisely to divorce us from the truth that we are all here and in this together.

We are an interdependent people, sharing a common bond of humanity.

The most pernicious aspect of Trump’s policies is thus the denial of those basic bonds and that humanity.

I will not stand for it, and no people of good conscience should.

The question before us, then, on Remembrance Day is a simple one: Will America remember?

The internment is not a “precedent,” it is a stark and painful lesson.

We will only learn from the past if we know, understand and remember it.

For if we fail, we most assuredly are doomed to repeat it.

(End of article)

I have known about this shameful chapter in the recent history of the United States of America for many years; however I never knew about the 19th of February being a solemn Day of Remembrance for Japanese-Americans.

This is the first time I have read or heard anything about it.

And that is precisely the problem.

I met a few Japanese-Americans, when I was in the US military, and none have ever said anything to me about this special day in February.

Many Japanese-Americans never like to bring up the terrible things that happened to their ancestors during World War II (WWII).

Even the fact that the Japanese-Americans soldiers who fought in Europe during WWII received many awards for bravery.

This is what Wikipedia says about the Japanese-American soldiers during WWII:

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team is an infantryregiment of the United States Army, part of the Army Reserve.

The regiment was a fighting unit composed almost entirely of American soldiers of Japanese ancestry who fought in World War II.

Most of the families of mainland Japanese Americans were confined to internment camps in the United States interior. Beginning in 1944, the regiment fought primarily in Europe during World War II, in particular Italy, southern France, and Germany.

The 442nd Regiment was the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of American warfare.

The 4,000 men who initially made up the unit in April 1943 had to be replaced nearly 2.5 times. In total, about 14,000 men served, earning 9,486 Purple Hearts.

The unit was awarded eight Presidential Unit Citations (five earned in one month).

Twenty-one of its members were awarded Medals of Honor.

Its motto was “Go for Broke.”

(End of Wikipedia quote)

This Day of Remembrance on the 19 February, should be a day of remembrance for ALL Americans.

If this had been done many years ago; then maybe there would not be some many hateful people, now calling for the same treatment of Muslim-Americans.

WHAT IS THE REAL MESSAGE OF “MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN”?

18 Feb

When some Americans, now talk about “making America great again.” What exactly are they talking about? As far as I can see, the United States of America (USA) is still one of the greate…

Source: WHAT IS THE REAL MESSAGE OF “MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN”?

Letter From Wicked King Leopold II to Christian Missionaries in Africa

17 Feb

UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DE MINAS GERAIS Faculdade de Filosofia e Ciências Humanas Departamento de História História Contemporânea    Prof. Luiz Arnaut Textos e documentos   Letter from one of the most…

Source: Letter From Wicked King Leopold II to Christian Missionaries in Africa

FALSE IMAGE OF JESUS (updated)

15 Feb

Jesus of Nazareth was a man who received Divine Inspiration from The Creator.  He was not  the Creator (nor the ‘son of The Creator’). To worship a physical flesh and blood Human Being as a god, sh…

Source: FALSE IMAGE OF JESUS (updated)