The Slave Master Who Wrote The Star Spangled Banner by Eric Jonathan Brewer

31 Aug

Who the fuck knew? I’ve been singing “The Star Spangled Banner” almost all my life and had no idea there were verses beyond the first, “O’er the land of the free and the home of t…

Source: The Slave Master Who Wrote The Star Spangled Banner by Eric Jonathan Brewer

The Slave Master Who Wrote The Star Spangled Banner by Eric Jonathan Brewer

30 Aug

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Who the fuck knew?

I’ve been singing “The Star Spangled Banner” almost all my life and had no idea there were verses beyond the first, “O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

Then here comes Colin Kaepernick, a quarterback for the San Francisco 49’ers, who enlightened us all. I’ve always said that sometimes you just don’t know, what you don’t know, you don’t know.

Kaepernick refused to stand for the USA’s national anthem as a protest, in part, because of the following extremely offensive lyrics.

“And where is that band who so vauntingly swore, That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion A home and a Country should leave us no more?

Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave, And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

I had no idea attorney Francis Scott Key was a slave owner who’d written lyrics bragging about killing black men and women who’d been slaves, but who sided with the British and Canadians to fight against the USA in exchange for freedom during the War of 1812.

The U.S. had invaded Canada and the border nations along the north.

Brothers and sisters were motivated so much by the taste of freedom, they joined with the Brits and Canadians, had a real March on Washington, and burned down the mutha fuckin’ White House that black hands built.

It was the only time foreign invaders have fought this nation on U.S. soil.

When the two sides ended the war in 1815, the guys Key was writing about demanded back the 6000 black men and women who’d been their property.

The Brits told them to go fuck themselves and refused. The brothers and sisters remained free in Canada, Nova Scotia and Trinidad.

Key was not only a slave owner, he prosecuted abolitionists for helping free slaves. Read his closing argument to the jury in the case against Dr. Reuben Crandall for distributing anti-slavery literature.

“Are you willing, gentlemen, to abandon your country, to permit it to be taken from you, and occupied by the abolitionist, according to whose taste it is to associate and amalgamate with the negro?”

“Or, gentlemen, on the other hand, are there laws in this community to defend you from the immediate abolitionist, who would open upon you the floodgates of such extensive wickedness and mischief?”

I know the more “learned” in the USA have been laughing about this shit for years.

Little Negro kids like me, and millions of others, growing up singing “The Star Spangled Banner” as young patriots in our Jim Crow schools not knowing we were singing about slaveholders killing our freedom loving black men and women ancestors.

We’d have gotten that shit out of the schools a long time ago if we’d known.

Ignorance is a bitch and this definitely puts President Barack Obama on the spot. Damn near 8 years in office and he didn’t know “THIS?”

Let’s be real. There’s a “militant” side to black history that white supremacists don’t want black folk to know.

It’s why the *Plain Dealer’s reporters write no words that empower black people. Whether we see it or not, America was built on white supremacy.

It’s everywhere in every facet of the American history “we’ve” been “allowed” to know.

The idea of freedom loving black men and women killing white men for freedom obviously doesn’t sit well with the white supremacist perspective Francis Scott Key believed in.

Key and other white supremacists believed slaves were so uncivilized they needed the white man to care for and discipline them.

It’s why John Brown, the white anti-slavery figure, is larger in American history than Denmark Vesey, the Maroons, Josiah Henson, the Black Refugees and the Black Loyalists.

It’s why Paul Robeson’s image has been twisted into something it’s not, and why Marcus Garvey had to be demonized.

Robeson was the most dangerous man in the world, according to President Harry Truman’s secretary of state, John Foster Dulles.

Did his danger have something to do with Robeson hooking up anti-colonial African leaders with Russian arms to kick the white supremacists out of their nations?

Imagine a black James Bond who’s tight with Russian dictator Josef Stalin, and who spoke 22 languages while hooking up secret arms deals by pretending to be a gospel singer.

He WOULD be the most dangerous man in the world, which is why Dulles snatched his passport.

From the beginning of American history, the free black man and woman fought against the ISIS leaders of their era.

Their names were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Adams, John Adams and the other terrorists who would create a U.S. government that enslaved them.

All the slave owning laws that sprang forth from their evil-minded terrorism was opposed by freedom loving black men and women who Britain and the Canadians embraced as equals.

That would be the spin on history if the other side had won. Today we honor these terrorists as our nation’s “founders.”

Imagine. George Washington today would be dogged by Trump as the leader of ISIS.

President Obama would be sending drones to kill his ass and bragging about how he took out “high value targets” like Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson.

Just like he announced the death of Osama bin Laden, Obama would be announcing the death of John Adams.

The “Star Spangled Banner” was officially made the USA’s anthem in 1916 by another racist, President Woodrow Wilson, who did it through an executive order.

Congress made it official in 1931 with the blessings of one of the most vicious Republican racists in the nation, President Herbert Hoover.

The same Congress and Hoover passed the Davis Bacon Act of 1931 to stop black men from taking construction jobs from white men.

85 percent of the construction workers in the south were black men.

They were moving north, competing with white men and winning. So much for not being able to find “qualified” blacks in the construction industry.

Knowing they’d lose the construction industry like they lost the NBA if they didn’t cheat with laws, Hoover and the white supremacists in Congress enacted the Davis Bacon Act to stop black construction workers from sending more white men to the unemployment lines.

It’s still on the books today just like we still sing the Star Spangled Banner.

Today it’s the Democrats pushing to keep the racist Davis Bacon Act on the books.

The same president who signed the Star Spangled Banner into law enforced segregation in the military and got rid of the Tuskegee Airmen.

This “Donald Trump-like” mutha fuckin’ Hoover stripped blacks of all important positions inside the Republican Party and took property from Mexicans at the nation’s borders before deporting them to Mexico City.

Hoover was so bad as a Republican he turned black people to the Democratic Party and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

It’s fitting that the man who inspired the phrase “it’s time to turn Lincoln’s picture to the wall” would sign the Star Spangled Banner into law as this nation’s anthem.

Kaepernick ain’t wrong for sitting this shit out.

I remember when Olympians Tommy Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in a black power salute back in 1968. I was turning 15 that year.

The Glenville and Hough riots were over. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy were assassinated that year.

I remember the fists and the controversy. I don’t remember the fists being anything about the “lyrics” of the “Star Spangled Banner.”

Kaepernick’s protest is “core shattering” because who the fuck knew all the lyrics Francis Scott Key wrote in his song?

It’s like learning that Jesus was just a man, not the son of God.

I know right now Obama’s kind of fucked up. First Lady Michelle Obama told us the White House was built by slaves. This one slept everybody. What’s “HE” got to say about “THIS?”

Read about the Black Refugees. The old black man in the picture is one of them. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Refugee_(War_of_1812).

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Read also about the Black Loyalists in the Book of Negroes who joined with the British against George Washington and his band of terrorists.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Loyalist

Below is all of the lyrics to the Star Spangled Banner. I’m with Kaepernick on this one. I ain’t ever singing this shit again.

O say can you see, by the dawn’s early light,
What so proudly we hail’d at the twilight’s last gleaming,
Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight
O’er the ramparts we watch’d were so gallantly streaming?
And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there,
O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

On the shore dimly seen through the mists of the deep
Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream,
’Tis the star-spangled banner – O long may it wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
A home and a Country should leave us no more?
Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

O thus be it ever when freemen shall stand
Between their lov’d home and the war’s desolation!
Blest with vict’ry and peace may the heav’n rescued land
Praise the power that hath made and preserv’d us a nation!
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto – “In God is our trust,”
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

*Cleveland, Ohio’s daily newspaper.

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Slavery and the national anthem: The surprising history behind Colin Kaepernick’s protest

30 Aug

(Article below from cnn.com) “The Star-Spangled Banner” was written by Francis Scott Key in 1814 about the American victory at the Battle of Fort McHenry. We only sing the first verse, …

Source: Slavery and the national anthem: The surprising history behind Colin Kaepernick’s protest

Slavery and the national anthem: The surprising history behind Colin Kaepernick’s protest

30 Aug
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(Article below from cnn.com)

“The Star-Spangled Banner” was written by Francis Scott Key in 1814 about the American victory at the Battle of Fort McHenry. We only sing the first verse, but Key penned three more. This is the third verse:

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,

That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion

A home and a Country should leave us no more?

Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.

No refuge could save the hireling and slave

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,

And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

The mere mention of “slave” is not entirely remarkable; slavery was alive and well in the United States in 1814. Key himself owned slaves, was an anti-abolitionist and once called his African brethren “a distinct and inferior race of people.”

Some interpretations of these lyrics contend Key was in fact taking pleasure in the deaths of freed black slaves who had decided to fight with the British against the United States.

In order to bolster their numbers, British forces offered slaves their freedom in British territories if they would join their cause during the war. These black recruits formed the Colonial Marines, and were looked down upon by people like Key who saw their actions as treasonous.

As an anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner” has never been a unanimous fit. Since it was officially designated as the national anthem in 1931, Americans have debated the suitability of its militaristic lyrics and difficult tune. (Some have offered up “God Bless America” and “America the Beautiful” as alternatives.)

Athletes and the American ritual

 

The American ritual of the national anthem has always been a crucible for patriotism and protest.

It presents a particularly fraught dynamic for sports stars, since sports events are often so closely tied with the rhetoric of American pride.

When a highly visible opinion comes up against a highly visible symbol, the result is always incendiary.

Around the same time Jackie Robinson was using his achievements to advance civil rights causes, two American Olympic runners, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, raised their fists in a black power saluteduring a medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City as the anthem was playing.

The result was iconic. The reaction was ugly. Racial slurs were hurled at the pair and an article in Time called it a “public display of petulance.”

Today, similar criticisms have been leveled against Kaepernick, a biracial Super Bowl quarterback who was raised by white adoptive parents and made $13 million in 2014.

He was called “spoiled.” He was called far worse in his Twitter mentions.

It’s a lot of ire for a gesture with a strong historical and rhetorical precedent.

One doesn’t even need to dip into iconic moments in history to follow the trend.

Former Cleveland Cavaliers player Dion Waiters refused to be on the court for the anthem in 2014.

And Denver Nuggets player Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf courted criticism after he deliberately sat during the anthem in 1996.

In fact, Kaepernick didn’t stand for the first two preseason games of this year prior to Friday’s display.

He wasn’t in uniform, so no one noticed.

Or if they did, they didn’t care.

(End of article)

I understand Colin Kaepernick’s reasons for not standing for the National Anthem.

He has every right as a citizen of the United States of America to not stand for the anthem.

But I don’t believe he has given any serious thought to the repercussions that he will now face for his actions.

I believe that he could do much more to bring to light all the reasons why he disagrees with standing for the anthem, another way.

By being the best quarterback in the NFL; helping his team to win games; maybe winning the Superbowl, receiving millions of dollars for endorsing products.

Then using the wealth that he has acquired to fund movies, programs that will highlight his concerns about the lack of justice for African Americans.

Muhammad Ali had the same concerns about the mistreatment of African Americans during the 1960s.

But nowhere can anyone show that Ali ever disrespected the National Anthem or the flag of the USA.

Another athlete in the past who during the National Anthem was shown praying was NBA’s star Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf.

He cupped his hands in a traditional Muslim prayer style instead of keeping his hands down.

This was deemed offensive.

His career ended prematurely because of his actions. 

MAHMOUD ABDUL RAUF

Denver Nuggets guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf stands with his teammates and prays during the national anthem before the game with the Chicago Bulls on Friday night, March 15, 1996, in Chicago. Abdul-Rauf, saying that the U.S. flag was a symbol of “oppression and tyranny,” was suspended Tuesday for sitting down during the national anthem. Friday was Abdul-Rauf’s first game back. The Bulls went on to beat the Nuggets 108-87. (AP Photo/Michael S. Green)

Below was a comment in 1996 about MahmoudAbdul-Rauf:

Dan Le Batard, Miami Herald

The NBA, in a stunning show of stupidity, has indefinitely suspended Denver guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf without pay. His crime (was) having an opinion.

In the NBA, you are only allowed to express a divergent view if you are Charles “I Am Not A Role Model” Barkley and it is endorsed by Nike.

So Abdul-Rauf refuses to acknowledge the national anthem and the NBA takes away his livelihood until he starts complying.

This league ought to change its slogan.

The NBA isn’t Fan-tastic.

It’s Comm-unistic.

I couldn’t disagree more with Abdul-Rauf but you must support his right to express those views.

(End of comment)

Unfortunately; 20 years later I don’t believe anything has changed.

I would be greatly surprised if Colin Kaepernick doesn’t suffer the same fate as Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf. 

My advise to Colin Kaepernick; is to find another way to fight against the injustice against African Americans. 

The Lord-Creator of the Heavens and Earth Does Not Have a Son

30 Aug

A Caucasian son of god was created in order to manipulate and control the Caucasian people of Europe. The people of Europe’s ego were fed with a concept that said, the Caucasian race was supe…

Source: The Lord-Creator of the Heavens and Earth Does Not Have a Son

UNDRESSED WOMEN; THE DEVIL’S CREATION

29 Aug

In the Holy Qur’an our Creator tells us that HE gave Human Beings the most beautiful apparel to cover themselves. Then our Creator says that Mankind was deceived by the Devil; who stripped them out…

Source: UNDRESSED WOMEN; THE DEVIL’S CREATION

UNDRESSED WOMEN; THE DEVIL’S CREATION

28 Aug

In the Holy Qur’an our Creator tells us that HE gave Human Beings the most beautiful apparel to cover themselves. Then our Creator says that Mankind was deceived by the Devil; who stripped them out…

Source: UNDRESSED WOMEN; THE DEVIL’S CREATION

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